One Dedicated Man Hits The Road To Save Lives & His Method Will Leave You Awestruck!

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Each year, approximately 7.6 million cats and dogs enter animal shelters nationwide. Although, they are commonly called shelters, for many of these animals they are not shelters at all, but merely a way station between the streets and death. Not all shelters are kill shelters, for those that are, nearly 3 million companion animals are euthanized. Although euthanasia is termed used for mercy killing, for these animals there is little mercy. Some of them are gassed, some die in the frenzy of the animals that are being gassed, and some are killed with a needle through the heart, many times without sedation. The root of the problem is overpopulation which is why spaying and neutering is so important. A small portion of the solution is a truck driver named Greg Mahle. He drives a tractor trailer cross country and his only cargo is unwanted dogs.

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Unfortunately, tractor trailer truck drivers often get a bad rap. They are perceived as messy and uneducated at best; at worst, a serial killer. While it is true that a disproportionate number of serial killers happen to be long haul truck drivers, it has little to do with the profession. In reality, most truckers are kind and warm, good people that make their living driving cross country to deliver products that Americans use every day. Along the way, they often make an impact on the lives of others.

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Greg Mahle and his organization, Rescueroadtrips.com are an example of those kinds of truckers. Twice a month for the last nine years, he has left his family and the comforts of home to drive a familiar route and pick up a number of dogs that have been rescued from high kill shelters, dogs previously on death row. So far he has helped to save tens of thousands of dogs. He begins his journey in Ohio, and then he takes them towards the New England states where shelter adoption is more prevalent. Greg does not enjoy a profit on these compassionate excursions because he does it out of love. Although he does get some financial support through the adoption fees, he only breaks even. If you ask him, he will tell you that he has never been happier.

Greg’s efforts are fierce, yet they are only a drop in the bucket compared to all of the animals that are left to fend for themselves. It is estimated that there are over 70 million stray cats alone and most of them are feral. The problem appears to be worse in the South, which is why Greg transports the rescued animals to the North. One of Greg’s most recent transports contained a Black Labrador puppy named Audi. Her pregnant mother was found living by a dumpster in Louisiana and scheduled for euthanasia at an animal control shelter. She was rescued by a rescue organization called Labs4Rescue before she was about to be killed and delivered 11 healthy puppies. Audi is one of the females. She, as well as her mother and all of her siblings, have found forever homes through Labs4Rescue and Greg Mahle.

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Greg began his rescue adventure 9 years ago with only a minivan. He has always loved animals and was devastated to realize that so many dogs in the South end up at high kill shelters, either because their owners have surrendered them or because the dogs were picked up as strays. His inspiration was the serious overpopulation and the senseless death of companion animals in the South and he wanted to find a way to help. His mission grew so large that he now uses a large tractor trailer to transport the dogs. He gets a little help from volunteers at designated stops for feeding and so that the dogs can relieve themselves. He loves the smiles on the faces of the new owners when they come to get their forever companions. Each dog that Greg transports could have been only hours away from dying just because they were believed to be unwanted.

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Every two weeks or so, Greg Mahle leaves from Ohio and travels through Texas, Mississippi, Alabama, and Louisiana to pick up his rescue dogs. Some he gets from rescue organizations, others from volunteers. Then he heads north, making designated stops along the way. Volunteers meet him at these designated pit stops to help feed and walk the dogs and to let Greg rest a bit. Greg sleeps in the tractor trailer with the dogs, ensuring that they are never left alone. Once the dogs have all been introduced to their forever home, Greg returns to Ohio to prepare for his next trip. He understands that he cannot help every dog slated for euthanasia, but he has made quite a difference in many canine lives, as well as the people who adopt them. We could use a million more like him.